Rohingya flee violence in Myanmar, Bangladesh turns them back
16 July 2012

Rohingya people rest by the road with their belongings as they move from their village after recent violence in Sittwe, June 16, 2012. (Reuters/Soe Zeya Tun, courtesy the Thomson Reuters Foundation – AlertNet)
We also recommend that the reform process in Myanmar address existing policies of discrimination against the Rohingya; and that this current crisis be used as an opportunity to address the longstanding problems between the communities in Rakhine State, and to promote a constructive dialogue aiming at peace and reconciliation.
Bangkok, July 17, 2012 — Jesuit Refugee Service and other civil society organizations are deeply concerned by on-going violence against stateless Rohingya people in Myanmar and their refoulement from Bangladesh. In Myanmar, what began as inter-communal violence has evolved into large-scale state sponsored violence against the Rohingya, while Bangladesh closed its border and pushed back many Rohingya fleeing the violence and persecution in Myanmar. 

Jesuit Refugee Service joined a coalition of organisations to sign on to the following statement, and to send it to the embassies of Myanmar and of Bangladesh around the world:

The stateless Rohingya of Myanmar have suffered from extreme persecution and discrimination for decades. They are now facing another crisis. On 3 June inter-communal violence erupted, and this has evolved into large-scale state sponsored violence against the Rohingya. Despite this, neighbouring Bangladesh is not allowing them to enter to seek refuge. The Rohingya population needs urgent measures to be taken for their protection.

In Myanmar, what began as inter-communal violence has evolved into large-scale state sponsored violence against the Rohingya. The violence began on 3 June 2012 and has mainly occurred in Sittwe and Maungdaw. On 10 June, a state of military emergency was declared, after which the military became more actively involved in committing acts of violence and other human rights abuses against the Rohingya including killings and mass scale arrests of Rohingya men and boys in North Rakhine State. Many Rohingya continue to be victims of violence and cannot leave their homes for fear of persecution, and are thus deprived of their livelihood and most basic needs. The urgent humanitarian needs of those displaced (IDPs) - including those not in IDP camps - are not being adequately met and there is concern that those displaced will not be allowed to return to their homes as soon as it is safe to do so, thus creating a situation of protracted displacement.

Bangladesh, in contravention of its international legal obligations, closed its border and pushed back many Rohingya fleeing the violence and persecution in Myanmar. The refoulement of these refugees by Bangladesh to Myanmar where they face a very immediate threat to life and freedom, and a danger of irreparable harm; and the manner of refoulement, by push backs into dangerous waters, including in unsafe vessels are matters of serious concern.

The legal obligations of both Myanmar and Bangladesh require them to protect all persons within their territories or subject to their jurisdictions, regardless of whether they are citizens, stateless persons or refugees. In their treatment of the Rohingya, both countries have violated the right to life, the right to be free from torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, the right to liberty and freedom from arbitrary detention, the right to food and shelter including the fundamental right to be free from hunger and the right to the highest attainable standard of health. Bangladesh has also acted in violation of the rights to seek and to enjoy asylum and not to be subjected to refoulement.

We therefore recommend that both states immediately uphold their human rights obligations in this situation.

In particular, we recommend that the Government of Myanmar and the Rakhine State authorities take immediate steps to:

  1. Stop the violence.
  2. Stop the arbitrary arrests of Rohingya and abuses by security forces against them.
  3. Allow unhindered humanitarian access to assist all those in need as a result of the crisis, including internally-displaced people staying outside camps and those hosting them.
  4. Allow the displaced to return to their homes once it is safe and they feel safe to return, and ensure that a situation of protracted displacement is avoided.
  5. Allow an international inquiry into the abuses committed since June 2012 in Rakhine State.

We recommend the Government of Bangladesh take immediate steps to:

  1. Open its borders to refugees and to stop refoulement of refugees.

Further, we call on the international community to:

  1. Provide financial support for the humanitarian operation needed to assist people affected by the crisis in Rakhine State.
  2. Support the government of Bangladesh in providing protection to Rohingya refugees.
  3. Engage with the Governments of Myanmar and Bangladesh in relation to the above recommendations.

We also recommend that the reform process in Myanmar address existing policies of discrimination against the Rohingya; and that this current crisis be used as an opportunity to address the longstanding problems between the communities in Rakhine State, and to promote a constructive dialogue aiming at peace and reconciliation.







Press Contact Information
Oliver White
asiapacificrao@jrs.or.th
+66 2 640 9590